Always Looking For Someone To Hate

tolesprop8I regard the unfortunate passing of Proposition 8 as more of an age gap thing than a racial or specifically cultural thing as a whole. Exit polls and surveying based on age proved that those 30 and over were voting for a constitutional ban on same-sex marriage in bigger numbers, and those are the folks who hit the polls right now. The turnover as the current 18-29 generation (yours truly included) becomes 30 and over will be much better for overturning noxious crap like this in the future, but it’s still disheartening.

Considering those exit polls, it doesn’t make any sense to blame black folk for Prop 8’s passage. Yes, I’m really disappointed in the 70-30 split. I thought we’d survived and emerged after having our rights denied for centuries. How do we turn that around and vote to strip other people of their rights?  It’s sad that we can’t see the irony in that; however, it’s not fair to lay it on black voters by forgetting to note that the only make up a little more than 6% of the state’s electorate.  It’s really on older, more church-going white folk and the largely Catholic Latino population.  Of course, we can’t forget the Latter-Day Saints funneling cash from Utah to fill the coffers and use scare tactics about children and religious freedom. Reprehensible stuff. Honestly, your preference to keep your children’s ears free from hearing about homosexuality end where other people’s civil rights begin.

But, I talked to a few family members in L.A., and they saw members from the black churches coming around and urging people to support Prop 8 — and there’s a bigger problem here. Yes, the conservative black, religious community has a homophobia problem; there’s a reason the “down low” has become a prevalent term.  I don’t have a whole lot of choice other than to say the black churches ought to be ashamed of even being a minor part of this effort — they may legitimately believe that that Jesus rails against homosexuality in the Bible (honestly, he really doesn’t) — but someone ought to be smart enough to recognize that your pastor’s preference shouldn’t guide public policy.  Black Pentecostal, Episcopalian, and Baptist churches were some of the moral centers when it came to helping urge people along in the Civil Rights movement, and to even hear of any members being a part of the Prop 8 debacle is rather infuriating.

However, the GLBT movement needs to do more outreach; the wide perception of “gay=white” is not helping it.  Much like feminism, it needs social advocacy, analysis, and critiques of race, class, and economics in order to be viable to more people — and it has to help out with GLBT folks who are a minority within a minority.

It’s telling that the majority of the No on 8 campaign’s advertising did not specifically mention marriage or say the words “gay” or “lesbian”, they only talked about discrimination and taking away rights (save an early ad with two white parents and the one with Samuel L. Jackson narrating).  This was reactive and an attempt not to actually discuss the issue. Ads directly tackling the fallacies in the Yes on 8 ads while talking about gay people and marriage rights would have been more effective. You don’t win by fudging the issue.

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So-Called “Accidental” Racism

How would you translate this graphic below, which apparently is good enough to be made into flyers by Republicans in the Inland Empire?

I would have gone with “Obama is a nigger,” but that’s just me.

From the Press-Enterprise:

The October newsletter by the Chaffey Community Republican Women, Federated says if Obama is elected his image will appear on food stamps — instead of dollar bills like other presidents. The statement is followed by an illustration of “Obama Bucks” — a phony $10 bill featuring Obama’s face on a donkey’s body, labeled “United States Food Stamps.”

The GOP newsletter, which was sent to about 200 members and associates of the group by e-mail and regular mail last week, is drawing harsh criticism from members of the political group, elected leaders, party officials and others as racist.

Good, that’s a start. But this is the mentality of way too many people overall (I don’t mean Republicans or Democrats), and it still exists in this country, sadly.  And the group’s president, Diane Fedele, is not exactly helping herself with her defense. She says she’s going to issue an apology, which is still insufficient, considering her obvious inability to identify stereotypes (that’s probably being too kind.)

She said she simply wanted to deride a comment Obama made over the summer about how as an African-American he “doesn’t look like all those other presidents on the dollar bills.”

“It was strictly an attempt to point out the outrageousness of his statement. I really don’t want to go into it any further,” Fedele said in a telephone interview Tuesday. “I absolutely apologize to anyone who was offended. That clearly wasn’t my attempt.”

Fedele said she got the illustration in a number of chain e-mails and decided to reprint it for her members in the Trumpeter newsletter because she was offended that Obama would draw attention to his own race. She declined to say who sent her the e-mails with the illustration.

She said she doesn’t think in racist terms, pointing out she once supported Republican Alan Keyes, an African-American who previously ran for president.

Dear Lord.  “I voted for a black person before, so I don’t think in racist terms.”  That excuses you from re-printing the worst stereotypes in a graphic image? Please.